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Read and rate Travel Journal Entries for Huayna Alcalde, Cusco, Peru

May 25, 2006 - Viva Para!!! **NEW ENTRY***

there is a fine line between a spirited public demonstration and violent protest. we crossed that line the moment the first rock hit the side of the bus.... The ride from Cusco to Puno was supposed to last about six hours, we would stop along the way and do some mountain biking, visit a hot springs and check out some ruins if there was time. we left early from the hotel in cusco to a clear, beautiful day. I dozed in the seat watching the scenery go by. the rough cobbled streets of Cusco soon lead to the open road. about an hour into the...

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Trip Journal


Peru 2006

Oct 29, 2005 - We're on the Train to Puno

Despite mixed reports over it's reliability, we opted to take the 10 hour, picturesque train journey from Cusco to Puno (near Lake Titicaca) instead of the more reliable bus service. It was spectacular! We "turtled" up (backpack on front & back) and boarded the backpacker class coach - not bad at all! Tablecloths, flowers, and a great three-course lunch. The scenery was spectacular. We were shocked at the extreme poverty and polluted waterways on the outskirts of Cusco, it certainly put our priveliged lives into perspective. We passed many...

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Trip Journal


Loges' Go Global

Oct 19, 2005 - Cusco, the Inca Trail and Lake Titicaca

We had a long days drive through to Cusco, however there was some fabulous scenery (altiplano almost like the desert road in NZ or parts of Scotland and huge mountains, some with snow - see photo). Cusco is a very colonial, Spanish city founded in 1534 by Francisco Pizaro after he had conquered the incas. Prior to that Cusco was the capital of the inca empire and most of the streets are lined with inca built stone walls and now form the foundations of the colonial buildings. The main square (Plaza de Armas - see photo) is the heart of the...

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Feb 13, 2005 - Into Thin Air

Altitude is an interesting phenomena. It is an important part of traveling in the Andes. It is always in the back of your mind. The breathlessness is no problem, it is the headache, nauseousness, loss of appetite and diarrhea that are far worse. In Canada we never really experience altitude. Last week we drove over a 4850m mountain pass and got out of our van at the summit. At this height any physical activity, such as standing, makes you dizzy, nauseous, and gives you a strange headache. Your limbs feel awkward. Tamara, who felt perfectly...

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