The Capper Nomads Europe Adventure travel blog

 

 

 

 

 

White cliffs

 

 

 

 

 

 


A beautiful warm sunny day. In the morning we walked along the river and through the old town of Les Andelys. After lunch we decided to climb up to the castle and enjoy the views of the Seine River as well as explore the castle.

Construction of the castle began in 1196 under the auspices of Richard the Lionheart, who was simultaneously King of England and feudal Duke of Normandy. The castle was expensive to build, but the majority of the work was done in an unusually short time. It took just two years, and at the same time the town of Petit Andely was constructed. Château Gaillard has a complex and advanced design, and uses early principles of concentric fortification; it was also one of the earliest European castles to use machicolations. The castle consists of three enclosures separated by dry moats, with a keep in the inner enclosure.

Château Gaillard was captured in 1204 by the French king, Philip II, after a lengthy siege. In the mid-14th century, the castle was the residence of the exiled David II of Scotland. The castle changed hands several times in the Hundred Years' War, but in 1449 the French king captured Château Gaillard from the English king definitively, and from then on it remained in French ownership. Henry IV of France ordered the demolition of Château Gaillard in 1599; although it was in ruins at the time, it was felt to be a threat to the security of the local population.

The views and the castle were well worth the climb. It had been a good start to our winter explorations.

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