RoseberryTopping in UK travel blog

View of Roseberry Topping from the Tees Valley

View from the start of the hike

View near the top

View from the top of the Tees Valley


Well, a beautiful weekend has finally come to the North of England while I am here for 2 weeks. Saturday was partly sunny with a slight breeze and about 66 F (low 50 F). I drove about 20 min from my flat in Yarm east towards coast to view Roseberry Topping.

Roseberry Topping

This unusually shaped hilltop (1049 feet high) can be clearly seen from many parts of rural Cleveland and industrial Teesside and has a distinctive outline (Image 1). Its summit has a distinctive half-cone shape with a jagged cliff, which has led to many comparisons with the much higher Matterhorn in Switzerland.. [Cleveland and Teesside are large areas within the northern and largest England county called North Yorkshire.)

Roseberry Topping was connected with the Vikings, as the word 'Topping', from 'Toppen', is one of a number of old Viking words for a hill, but the original Viking name for Roseberry Topping was Odins-Beorge meaning Odin's Hill. Roseberry may have been a centre for the worship of the Viking god Odin in Pagan times. Association of the hilltop with the village then called Newton-under-Ouseberry at the foot of the hill led to the modern name Roseberry when the final 'R' of 'under' produced the initial letter of the modern name. Newton under Ouseberry is now called Newton under Roseberry.

In August 1912 a large section of the south-west slope of the hill collapsed in an avalanche of tumbling rock. Overnight the conical hill had become a jagged peak. Inevitably, accusations were levelled at the mining company, whose drives had honeycombed the hill. Roseberry Topping is criss-crossed by faults and fissures just below the surface, so it seems probable landslips would occur whether or not the mines had operated.

Image 2 is one from the parking lot before starting the 1 hr hike up the hillside. Image 3 is one from the stone faced trail near the top of the hillside. Image 4 is the dramatic view from the top looking down on the Tees River valley.



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