The Capper Nomads Europe Adventure travel blog

The countryside

Danby station

Looking to the moors

Across the moors

Another view across the moors

Moorland view

Resident Peacock

Coat of Arms of Lord Preston

Coat of Arms Lady Preston

Garden at Nunnington Hall

Nunnington Hall

Nursery at the hall

another view of the house

Bridge over the little river by the house


Yesterday we were due to move on to our next campground. However our next campground rang us to say that they were cancelling our reservation due to them having to evacuate the campground as a result of the River Ure flooding! Fortunately we were able to remain in Scarborough for a few more days.

We spent Friday on a domestic type day as the weather was not very good. This included a tanks dump, which on English campground is a task and half as they do not have easy accessible dump stations. For us it meant moving the coach and then reversing about a hundred yards to the nearest manhole cover and letting go. No sealed connections here!

As we were all closed up we decided we would go and fill up with LPG at a nearby petrol station. This is the second major task as first we have to find a petrol station which has a wide entrance and a high enough canopy for us to go underneath as the LPG our Autogas is often in the middle of the set of pumps. We then have to fill it up ourselves-no approved pump attendants here!

Saturday was a lovely day so we headed out to the least visited part of the Yorkshire Moors the Esk Valley. After winding through country lanes we stopped at the small village of Danby and took a short walk in the area enjoying the countryside.

After a refreshment stop we headed out and found the road to cross the moors back to base. The all round views of the moors and dales were just beautiful in their wild and rugged way.

On our way back we came across Nunnington Hall another National Trust property, so using our passes once again we had a quick look around the house and gardens. The house was very much a family home rather than a grand palace. It did have an interesting collection of miniature rooms called the Carlisle Collection and some resident peacocks.

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