The Capper Nomads Europe Adventure travel blog

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Today we headed north from Seahouses to the small village of Bamburgh. The village was formerly the capital of Northumbria and the area had been occupied for over 10,000 years. As you enter Bamburgh from any direction the Bamburgh Castle sits high above the village on a basalt outcrop. A magnificent castle which dominates the skyline.

Our first stop of course was the castle. The castle has significant history going back to Norman times when the main part of the castle was built. However over time the castle has been extended and modified. The castle has seen many owners from Henry II to the present owners the Armstrong’s, descendents of the famous Victorian Industrialist William Armstrong who was instrumental in restoring the castle to its former glory.

As we explored the castle grounds and ramparts we got great panoramic views. It was worth visiting the castle for the views, but visiting the inside the castle we found a few other surprises. Tony found the Armstrong and Aviation Artefacts Museum fascinating being amazed by the extent of engineering development by Lord Armstrong, from the Armstrong guns, warships and the hydraulic accumulator. For Heather the King’s Hall was the highlight with magnificent and very high standard Victorian craftsmanship but based on the original medieval floor plan. The richness of the hall was outstanding. We learnt that there was over 300 tons of teak in the King’s Hall ceiling.

After exploring the castle we took Daisy for a stroll around beneath the Castle before heading down to the beach below.

We then explored the village and visited the Grace Darling museum which tells about the life of Grace Darling who became famous for her heroic rescue with her father of the survivors from the wreck of the Forfarshire which had gone aground on the Farne Island just off the coast in September 1838. The sad part of the story was she died four years later.

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