Kapoors Year 12B: Mexico and Colombia travel blog

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BACKGROUND

Here’s some of what the Lonely Planet – Colombia chapter Caribbean Coast has to say about Cartagena’s Eating And Drinking:

Eating

“You can eat well in Cartagena, whether it be a COP$12,000 (CAD $6.00) comida corriente (daily set menu) meal at midday in a busy local lunch spot or a gourmet blowout feast inside a colonial-era boutique hotel.

The city is also strong on street food: plenty of snack bars all across the old town serve typical local snacks such as arepas de huevo (fried maize dough with an egg inside), dedos de queso (deep-fried cheese sticks), empanadas (meat and/or cheese pastries) and buñuelos (deep-fried maize and cheese balls).

Try typical local sweets at confectionery stands lining El Portal de los Dulces on the Plaza de los Coches.

In restaurants, you’ll see the ubiquitous arroz con coco (rice sweetened with coconut) as an accompaniment to most fish and meat dishes. Fruit stalls are also everywhere (and are often mobile).”

Drinking

Cartagena’s bar scene is centered on the Plaza de los Coches in El Centro, while along Calle del Arsenal in Getsemaní the clubs are bigger and the prices higher. Weekends are best and the action doesn’t really heat up until after midnight.

You can go on a night trip aboard a chiva (a typical Colombian bus) with a band playing vallenato and all-you-can-drink aguardiente (easy, now).

To the south of the old walled town is the peninsula of Bocagrande – Cartagena’s Miami Beach – is where fashionable cartagenos sip coffee in trendy cafes, dine in glossy restaurants and live in the upscale luxury condos that line the area like guardians to a New World.

KAPOORS ON THE ROAD

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