John and Janet 2015 Alabama travel blog

Horseshoe Bend

Janet and Oh

Oh Finds a Pinecone

It's Heavy

Firing Cannon

Firing Cannon

Firing Cannon

Firing Cannon

Camp

Creek Indian

Camp

Battle of Horseshoe Bend

Battle of Horseshoe Bend

Battle of Horseshoe Bend

Battle of Horseshoe Bend

Battle of Horseshoe Bend

Battle of Horseshoe Bend

Battle of Horseshoe Bend

Oh Wants a Ride


We like our RV Park. We consider staying an extra day. We could get out on the water. The only problem is the heat. It is May and we are in the south.

We get a late start but we head north. The roads in Alabama are good. In less than two hours, we are at Horseshoe Bend National Military Park. I get a stamp and we watch the twenty minute video.

History: On March 27, 1814, 3,300 Tennessee militia, U.S. Regulars and allied warriors under Andrew Jackson’s command defeated 1,000 Red Sticks led by Chief Menawa. The Battle of Horseshoe Bend ended the Creek Indian War, and the peace treaty added 23 million acres of Creek land to the southeastern United States – three-fifths of Alabama and one-fifth of Georgia.

Because it is a weekend, there are reenactments taking place. We watch a cannon being fired. We visit a typical camp.

There is a loop road around the battlefield. We get the motorcycle out. It is a short ride but it is cool on the bike.

This is a small park but an enjoyable stop. We have an hour drive to our next campground so we again get on the road.

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