Kapoors Year 8: Scotland/India/Bhutan travel blog

We Managed To Find A Place To Sleep At A Friendly B&B,...

We Drove Over To View The Famous Scone Palace, Where The 'Stone...

Scotland Is Famous For Its Highland Cattle, These Ones Grazing Near The...

This One Was Almost Too Close For Comfort!

We Carried On To Drive Through The Scenic Villages Of Birnam and...

The Name Athol Caught My Eye, My Brother Teaches At The Atholl...

A Few Seconds Later The Sun Came Out To Make My Picture...

The Beautiful Ivy On The Stone Gate Caught My Eye, Then I...

We Drove In To Explore The Grounds And Saw Sheep Grazing All...

What An Idyllic Spot For A Country Hotel, I Think That Sheep...

Further On We Stopped For Tea And Anil Decided To Try 'Millionaire...


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BACKGROUND

Here’s what the Lonely Planet – Great Britain chapter on Stirling – Central Scotland has to say about Perthshire:

“For sheer scenic variety, Perthshire is the pick of Scotland’s regions and a place where everyone will find a special, personal spot - whether it’s a bleak moor, snaking loch, postcard-perfect village or magnificent forest. Highlights are many: the enchanting valley of Glen Lyon strikes visitors dumb with its wild and remote beauty; stunning Loch Tay is nearby; and the River Tay runs east from here towards Dunkeld, whose cathedral is among the most beautifully situated in the country.

Things begin sedately in the southeast corner with Perth itself, a fine country town with a fabulous attraction in lavish Scone Palace, and get gradually wilder as you move northwards and westwards, moving through wooded slopes and river-blessed valleys and culminating in the bleak expanse of Rannoch Moor.

Perth, is sedately arranged along the banks of the Tay. This former capital of Scotland is a most liveable place with large tracts of enticing parkland surrounding an easily managed centre. On its outskirts lies Scone Palace, a country house of staggering luxury built alongside the mound that was the crowning place of Scotland’s kings. It’s really a must-see.

Here in 838, Kenneth MacAlpin became the first king of a united Scotland and brought the Stone of Destiny, on which Scottish kings were ceremonially invested, to Moot Hill. In 1296 Edward I of England carted the talisman off to Westminster Abbey, where it remained for 700 years before being returned to Scotland.”

KAPOORS ON THE ROAD

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