Kapoors Summer 2019: Alaska and The Arctic Circle travel blog

Until 2000 The Only Way To Reach Whittier From Anchorage Was By...

When The Anton Anderson Tunnel Opened In 2000 The First Highway To...

We Arrived On The Chugach Express And Took A Stroll Through The...

The Spencer Glacier Tour Takes Advantage Of The Train's Schedule To Drop...

The Town Of 200+ Residents Became A Port Of Call For Cruise...

With The Opening Of The Tunnel To Vehicle Traffic, Large Cruise Ships...

Many Of Our Fellow Tour Group Picked Up Take-Away Food At The...

I Walked Down The Gangplank To Have A Chat With The Friendly...

Then We Made Our Way Back Towards The Train, It Was Just...

Anil Got A Kick Out Of This Massive Wooden Fish Sculpture, This...

What A Beautiful Setting, But I Know I Wouldn't Enjoy Living In...


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BACKGROUND

Here’s some of what the Whittier Alaska website has to say about the port:

“Situated at the head of Passage Canal, the community of Whittier is approximately 58 miles southeast of Anchorage. Whittier is by far the most visited gateway to the mesmerizing wilderness of Prince William Sound. Each summer, thousands of visitors arrive at this magnificent port by ship, train, or automobile.

This area originally was part of the portage route for the Chugach Natives of Prince William Sound travelling to fish the Turnagain Arm. Later the Russians and Americans exploring the region also used this passage. It was used by prospecting miners during the gold rush, as it was the quickest passage from the Sound to the Cook Inlet and Interior regions.

The City of Whittier was incorporated in 1969. Today, less than 300 people reside in the town supporting the Alaska State Ferry, the Alaska Railroad, freight barge, commercial fishing, the Whittier Harbour, recreation and tourism with an annual visiting population of over 700,000.”

KAPOORS ON THE ROAD

Much like the hundreds of thousands of visitors to Whittier, we were just passing through on the way to somewhere else. For us, the visit was necessitated by the fact that the Spencer Glacier and Placer River Float Tour we were taking made use of the Alaska Railways regularly scheduled trains to get us in and out of the remote region. After passing through the Anton Anderson Memorial Tunnel the train pulled into Whittier and spent an hour there before reversing itself back through the tunnel.

We took a stroll through the few buildings that stand near the tracks, to enjoy the morning sunshine, while others in our group headed to the Inn at Whittier to pick up some take-away lunch. We had picked up our provisions earlier that morning at the Red Chair Café in Anchorage. It was time to try their chocolate red wine cookies.

The train’s whistle called us back to our rail car; we’d be in town less than an hour.

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